It’s a Wonderful Life, is still relevant today…and that’s a problem.

Last night, I finally sat to down to watch my favourite Christmas movie. The timeless classic, It’s a Wonderful Life. It’s themes of our common humanity and the impact one person can have on his or her friends and family, still resonate today. Maybe this year it’s more important than other years to hear that message.

However, there was one scene that stuck out to me though:

Aside from the amount quoted of $5,000 needed to get a mortgage for a home, I have a sense that this entire monologue could be said today word for word and it’d be still as relevant and poignant as it was then. Isn’t that a bit of a problem?

Here we are in the 21st century. It’s a Wonderful Life was made in 1947. Nearly three quarters of a century has passed since. How is it we are still having to make the same arguments to help people get ahead in life. George Bailey makes the best argument I could imagine. That by doing so it helps those people become better citizens and customers for the economy. For George it’s a simple equation. You help out a friend or a stranger and it helps you out in the long run.

A lesson which is driven home in the famous ending. Spoiler…yes I’m going to show the clip in case you’ve been living under a rock for decades.

George is proven right in the end. His faith in humanity is rewarded. Indeed, Clarence’s reminder to George sums up what we all need to hear:

“Remember, no man is a failure who has friends!”

As we start to head into 2021, lets all try to be a little less Potter, and a little more George Bailey.

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